Hey look at this cool thing | Friday link round up

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Sweet Vampire: the Masquerade fan site

ONE TERABYTE OF KILOBYTE AGE PHOTO OP

The tumblr which accompanies the Geocities Research Blog – digging through the terabyte-large file which constitutes the Geocities Archive. I feel an intense, profound and fairly sugary amount of nostalgia looking at this stuff. Not to mention a strange mix of hope/trepidation that my own little corner of the early web might be somewhere in there. If I recall it was chiefly comprised of X-Files .wav files and a lot of really awesome gifs, including a Mona Lisa which flipped you off. Of related interest: the Geocities-iser. Speakers on pls.


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This cat looks pretty indignant about having its curiosity satisfied

COLLECTION OF RETRO LIBRARY POSTERS

Gorgeous collection of retro library posters believed to be from the mid 1960s. Am also a fan of What’s your future? as I like the idea of being interrupted during my important report on jumpers to be told what to do by a floating (haunted???) orb-encircled book.


Example of Index Card to be transcribed for Carnamah Historical Society & Museum

VIRTUAL VOLUNTEERING WITH THE CARNAMAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Help make Carnamah’s Historical Society’s records and archives more searchable/discoverable by donating some time to transcribe elements from a collection. “Micro-volunteering” is hardly a new phenomenon, but I found this project particularly interesting as the museum staff is quite small (two people), and so this crowd-sourcing approach has the potential to drastically impact on the museum’s activities. Definitely worth checking out the beautifully curated and presented Virtual Museum as well.


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MOHAMMAD REZA’S KALEIDOSCOPIC PHOTOGRAPHY

Mohammad Reza Domiri Ganji is an Iranian photographer who uses a wide angle lens to take some of the most stunning photographs of mosques I’ve ever seen. Breathtaking. Via Gizmodo.


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2 responses to “Hey look at this cool thing | Friday link round up

  1. Many thanks for the mentions and links to our Virtual Volunteering website and our Virtual Museum. You’re on the money, even just a few extra hands makes an enormous difference to a small regional historical society. On the other side of the coin it allows people to take part in activities that are located somewhat obscurely!

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    • Wow, thank you for your message! Virtual volunteering has so many excellent facets, particularly its ability to involve people regardless of their geographical location. Enabling helpers from all over the country to participate means that the volunteer pool may contain a diverse mix of knowledge and experience. Best of luck with your project 🙂

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